Peter Chernin: The Future of Live Sports is Online

Former News Corp. president Peter Chernin, who now runs The Chernin Group, thinks live sports will eventually be a bigger business on the web than on broadcast channels.

044924465-st-patricks-day-sports-showgro“I’m not sure what the timeline is, but there’s clearly more money to be made online than there is out of those broadcast deals,” he said Wednesday at the Re/Code Media conference. “There’s more money to be made on a subscription basis, through targeting, they’re global, there’s almost zero distribution friction. I think what the leagues are wrestling with, especially the big leagues, is what is the breadth of their audience on each of those three big national platforms.” Read More »

Net neutrality disconnection?

As ISPs, both large and small, gear up to sue the FCC over its forthcoming net neutrality order, even strong supporters of net neutrality have begun pointing to potential legal problems with the proposal outlined by FCC chairman Tom Wheeler earlier this month. One of biggest we-can-haz-net-neutralitypotential problems, as far as OTT providers are concerned, was flagged by Free Press policy director Matthew Wood. Read More »

Sling takes a swing at the mobile-phone model

One of Dish’s aims in developing Sling TV was to keep the cost low enough to attract those otherwise disinclined to pay for TV service.

“Affordability is a key attribute of the Sling TV service,” Dish president Joe Clayton said at CES. “The price will be substantially — and I mean substantially — below” traditional pay-TV offerings.

FTV-DishDoc-FTVSDevice-300x265Compared to Netflix, Hulu Plus and other OTT streaming services, however, the $20 a month base price for Sling TV is actually pretty high. And that higher price point, and therefore higher ARPU, is allowing Sling to experiment with a business model other streaming services have eschewed so far: subsidized hardware. Read More »

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart’s legacy

In addition to their many other accomplishments, it’s hard to overstate the impact that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have had on the evolution of the TV business over the past decade. As Stewart now follows Colbert from his late-night, Comedy Central post they leave a transformed industry in their wakes.

jon-stewart-leaving-the-daily-showStewart and Colbert didn’t invent irony on television, or even in fake news — Chevy Chase’s Weekend Update segments on Saturday Night Live helped get that ball rolling 40 years ago — but their incisive, if mocking nightly meta-critique of how “truthiness” in news is manufactured, packaged and sold today left mainstream news organizations all looking self-consciously over their shoulders. At the same time, they helped create an entirely new paradigm for how a generation of viewers watched and understood the news. Read More »

Title II, Round 2

Now that we know the broad outlines of the FCC’s forthcoming open internet order the next phase of the battle over net neutrality rules is getting under way. It will be fought out on at least three fronts: in the courts, on Capitol Hill and within the FCC itself.

The main front will be in the courts, where litigation is all but certain to be filed challenging the commission’s decision to reclassify broadband access as a Title II telecommunications service, probably by AT&T, just as soon as the new rules are formally published in the Federal Register. AT&T has already telegraphed its litigation plans, as well as the legal arguments it’s likely to make. Read More »