Music labels finally getting a clue

Interesting piece by Brad Stone in this morning’s NYTimes on the music labels’ shift away from imposing punitive terms on digital music start-ups in favor of terms that might let them stay alive long enough to actually create some business for the record companies.

imeem-universalStone uses as his hook the recent experience of Imeem, which was on the verge of shutting down because its ad revenue could not begin to cover the millions it owed the labels in licensing fees, but was given an 11th-hour reprieve when Warner Music Group agreed to forgive Imeem’s debt and both Warner and Universal Music modified their licensing terms with the online music service. That allowed Imeem to raise new financing and stay in operation.

“We are trying to figure out how to restructure partnerships and develop a healthier ecosystem where entrepreneurs can continue to innovate,” Warner Music’s Michael Nash told the Times.

Is Apple about to steal a march on mobile video competitors?

Media Wonk was away over the Memorial Day weekend so I’m just catching up on some stories that broke last week. One that didn’t seem to get the attention it merited was Kwame Jones’ scoop on Open Salon that Apple appears to be readying a plan to allow movie and TV downloads directly to iPhones and iPod Touches without their first having to stop first at a desktop or laptop hard drive. Jones posted some screen shots provided by a “geeky friend” who stumbled on links to “iTunes Movies” and “iTunes TV” crawling across the top of a new ad-supported iPhone app. The screen shots captured menu and ordering screens for movies and TV shows broken out by genre, season and other features.

Ars Technica expressed some skepticism about “the story behind this one,” declaring it “highly unlikely that Apple would run ads for such a feature through a network like AdMob,” or “that Apple would create an ad like that this far in advance, knowing that non-Apple-employees have a high likelihood of seeing it.”

What media companies could learn from OpenTable.com

UPDATE: OpenTable successfully sold 3 million shares in its initial offering Thursday at $20 a share–well above its target range of $16 – $18. The shares closed up nearly 60% in their first day of trading, to $31.89.

We’re a long way from the heady days of a decade ago when justaboutanything.com could go public almost before it launched and in spite of having no profits, few assets and no idea how to make money.

Good times.