CBS All Access: Live Long And Differentiate

The original five-year mission of the Starship Enterprise was to explore strange new worlds and to seek out new lives and new civilizations. When it next leaves space dock, in 2017, it’s mission will be to explore a new strategy for transporting network TV content over-the-top.

CBS this week thrilled Trekkers throughout the galaxy by announcing the debut of a new, as yet untitled Star Trek series in January 2017, the first new series since the cancellation of “Star Trek: Enterprise” in 2005. But in a plot twist worthy of a Romulan cloaking device, the series will only be viewable in the U.S. on CBS All Access, the network’s $5.99 a month over-the-top streaming service.

Mr-SpockThe move caused many a media head to be scratched. CBS hasn’t disclosed how many subscribers CBS All Access has, but it’s almost certainly fewer than a million, a tiny fraction of the audience reach of CBS itself. Even if CBS wanted to make the new series streaming-only, Netflix has 40 million U.S. subscribers, Amazon Prime Video isn’t far behind, and Hulu has more than 9 million.

CBS All Access is sure to grow between now and 2017, of course. The app is on the new Apple TV and other OTT platforms, and the network continues to negotiate with the NFL for streaming rights to at least some of the games CBS currently broadcasts, all of which should help drive subscriptions. But even with those opportunities it isn’t going to reach Netflix-like numbers by 2017, and maybe not even Hulu numbers. So why such a small platform for such a big franchise like Star Trek? Read More »