Return Of The Gatekeeper

Making content available on-demand was supposed to put the consumer in charge. Armed with “personalization” tools and backed by social media filtering the viewer/listener/reader would be king, usurping the power of traditional gatekeepers.

But a funny thing is happening on the way to the throne: consumers increasingly are inviting gatekeepers back into the realm, albeit not necessarily the same ones they had overthrown.

guard-buckhm-palace-shst_w_755Speaking at MIDEM this week, MIDiA analyst Mark Mulligan reported that “The percentage of people who make their own playlists on streaming has dropped by 10 percentage points in just one year,” said Mulligan. “The main playlists which people are using are the playlists which are being pushed to them,” by the streaming services, or in some cases by record labels.

Citing data provided by Spotify, Mulligan noted that in December 2014, Spotify’s Today’s Top Hits playlist had 2.3 million followers and generated 35.4 million streams per month. By April 2016 it had grown to 7.8 million followers and was generating more than 120 million streams a month. Read More »

The First, Rough Hashtag of History

Social media networks are in a rush to get into the events business. Breaking news events, that is. The latest to take the plunge is Instagram, which announced a pair of updates Tuesday designed to make it easier for users to follow events as they unfold in real time through images uploaded to the platform.

Periscope_screenshotThe first update is an overhaul of Facebook-owned site’s Explore tab to allow users to pull of images taken at a specific place or under a particular hashtag. The other is a powerful new search function that lets users search by hashtag or location.

“If you’re a journalist and you want to see live photos happening at any location in our system, you can simply type in the location and up comes the page,” Instagram CEO and cofounder Kevin Systrom told the Wall Street Journal.

The Instagram moves come on the heels of Twitter’s unveiling of Project Lightning, a new feature also designed to make it easier for users to follow breaking news events as they unfold. A new Project Lightning button in the Twitter app will call up eight to 12 human-curated feeds, with an emphasis on images and videos, each focused on a particular breaking event. It also follows the launch of YouTube Newswire, a new service from the Google-owned video site that will provide news organizations with curated feeds of verified videos taken by eyewitnesses to breaking news events.

And, though all of those new services and features must have been in the works for months given the amount of coding and testing they would have required, they all follow the appearance earlier this year of Periscope and Meerkat, which put a spotlight on the growing importance of live and real-time content on the web. Read More »