Rethinking Music: What The Industry Could Learn From Netflix

It seems fair to say that no one in the music business right now is happy with how it’s being run. As streaming, including both paid and ad-supported, has replaced CD sales as the industry’s main economic engine, the record companies have seen gross revenue decline sharply, artists and songwriters have seen their royalty income diminished, and the companies doing the streaming are losing so much money they’re losing the ability to raise more of it.

In an interesting thought experiment at the Future of Music Policy Summit in Washington this week, musician and CEO of touring van rental service Bandago Sharky Laguana, considered how one component of the industry’s current business model — how subscription revenue Music_Festivalfrom paid streaming services is ultimately allocated to individual artists — might be made more fair, if not necessarily more lucrative.

In very broad strokes, of the $10 a month most subscription services charge consumers, the streaming service keeps $3 (30 percent) and $7 (70 percent) is paid out in royalties (theoretically to artists and songwriters but in practical terms to labels and publishers who are supposed to then distribute them). The portion of that $7 accruing to any one label is calculated based on how many times songs recorded by any of the artists under contract to the label are streamed by subscribers, typically resulting in a per-stream value of a fraction of a penny. Read More »