2020 Vision: Trends and Topics for the New Year

Happy New Year. The 2010s, among other things, were a decade of profound, rapid and often gob-smacking change in the media industries and their intersection with other industries, particularly technology and the internet. So, as we look ahead to a new year and a new decade, what should we expect?

Some consolidation of gains, still more turmoil, and additional smacking of gobs would be my guess. Without venturing any hard predictions that would no doubt quickly be proved wrong, here are some trends and topics we think will be making news in the year(s) ahead:

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The Last Picture Show?

The U.S. Justice Department is preparing to end the so-called Paramount consent decrees that have long barred major movie studios from owning movie theaters.

The decrees have been in place since 1949, the result of a series of anti-trust actions brought by the department against various studios over restrictive booking practices, including the favoring of their own theaters over others in distributing their movies and “block booking,” in which studios forced theaters to book an entire slate of films to get the highest-profile releases.

In announcing the move, the head of DOJ’s anti-trust division, Markan Delrahim, noted that technology and market realities have long-since left the original purpose of the decrees behind, as streaming and other non-theatrical forms of distribution have grown more important to Hollywood’s bottom line and reshaped how people watch movies.

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Spotify Works the Margins

In its first-quarter earnings report, Spotify missed Wall Street’s earnings target by a whopping $0.53 a share, despite beating expectations for both revenue and paid subscriber growth.

The streaming service posted a net loss of $0.90 per share, compared to the consensus estimate of $0.37, even as top-line revenue grew by 33 percent year-over-year and beat the Street by 3 percent.

Part of the shortfall could be attributed to various promotion campaigns the streaming service ran during the period, which included discounted service bundles offered in partnership with Hulu. But the stark disconnect between revenue and earnings underscored a long-standing concern over Spotify’s core business model.

“The most important thing is [Libra] will enable paying for things digitally in many of the places around the world where those kind of methods just doesn’t exist. A service like Spotify, you can imagine what would happen by allowing users for instance to be able to pay artists directly,”

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‘Friends’ In Need

Who needs “Friends” more, Netflix of AT&T’s WarnerMedia? 

That was the question put by this week’s headline-grabbing deal in which Netflix agreed to pay $100 million to keep streaming rights to the venerable sitcom for another year. After that, Netflix may still get access to Rachel and the gang but the series is also likely to become available on AT&T’s planned direct-to-consumer streaming service as well.

“Friends” is obviously a valuable series to Netflix, or it would not have paid so handsomely for non-exclusive rights. But calculating that price would have been a fairly straight forward process for Netflix. It knows how many of its subscribers watch the series and how often, and it can calculate its value for attracting new subscribers. For AT&T and WarnerMedia, not so much.

AT&T plans to launch its direct-to-consumer service at the end of 2019 and plans to populate it largely with its own programming, at least in the early years. While Warner has a vast library of content, going back decades, from its many film and television production studios, it doesn’t calculate the value of the movies and TV series in that library the same way Netflix would. 

Like Netflix, AT&T is in the business of selling subscriptions: to wireless service, broadband, landline phone service, and more recently pay-TV through its acquisition of DirecTV. WarnerMedia, however, is built around selling content, in discreet units, for limited times. It has to reckon not just how much a piece of content is worth, but where it worth the most, as AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson acknowledged this week

Is “Friends” worth more in broad distribution through platforms like Netflix, or being kept out of circulation to be used as an exclusive to drive subscriptions to the new streaming service? 

And “Friends” is a fairly easy case. The series is more than 20 years old and, presumably, its costs have long-since been recouped, apart from residuals. So in a sense, AT&T and Warner are playing with house money. 

AT&T also spent $104 billion to acquire Time Warner, including assumption of debt, and now has more than $180 billion in debt on its balance sheet. It can’t really afford to leave a cash cow like “Friends” in the barn without fully milking it. 

But not every series is going to command the sort of premium “Friends” can pull in for a non-exclusive deal. AT&T is going to have to make a tricky calculation for every piece of content WarnerMedia owns, and for every new production it finances: Is this movie or series worth more in distribution, or driving subscriptions? 

That could make for some difficult investment decisions, to say nothing of negotiations with potential investors, creators and other rights owners in a new piece of content. 

Over time, as AT&T collects more direct consumer viewing data, that calculation could get easier, or at least more reliable. But there’s a long way to go between now and then. 

Apple’s Latest TV Tease

For the best part of a decade, the heads of Apple, including Steve Jobs and current CEO Tim Cook, have had a side-career teasing fanboys and analysts about a major move into TV and video.

Jobs famously told his biographer, Walter Isaacson, that he “finally cracked” the secret to re-engineering the TV viewing experience, and just weeks before his death called tech columnist Walt Mossberg to say he had figured out how to “remake” television.

Whatever it was Jobs had figured out, though, he took it with him to his grave because nothing like what Jobs described to Iasaacson was ever released.

That didn’t stop his successor, Cook, from continuing the tease, however. For several years after, Cook made a habit of dropping hints about some new TV project or another, and stories leaked out of Hollywood every six months or so that Apple content chief, Eddie Cue, was talking with the studios and TV networks about licensing content for some sort of new Apple video service.

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