Welcome To The RightsTech Revolution

Concurrent Media Strategies, LLC, publisher of the Concurrent Media blog, and Digital Media Wire, Inc., producers of Digital Entertainment World and the New York Media Festival, among other conferences, today announced the official launch of RightsTech, a new forum — blog, newsletter, conferences — for cross-industry global collaboration focused on furthering technology innovation around rights management and licensing across multiple media verticals.

rightstechlogo-2The inaugural RightsTech Summit will be held July 26 at the the Japan Society in New York City. The newsletter, which you can subscribe to here, will keep you up to date on all the news and conversation around the emerging RightsTech ecosystem. The blog will be an evolving platform for discussion and debate among the various stakeholders. Read More »

RightsTech Summit set for New York City on July 26

On July 26 Digital Media Wire and Concurrent Media Strategies will hold the inaugural RightsTech Summit at the Japan Society in New York City, a 1-day executive leadership conference that brings together cross-industry leaders focused on furthering technology innovation around rights management and licensing across multiple media verticals.

rightstechlogo2One of the goals of the event is the establishment of industry best practices for the rapidly evolving RightsTech ecosystem.

Issues and discussion groups at the inaugural RightsTech Summit include:

  • Machine Readable Rights
  • Smart Contracts
  • Shared Responsibilities
  • Blockchain and Big Data
  • RightsTech in the Enterprise
  • RightsTech and Direct-to-Consumer Distribution
  • RightsTech and Piracy
  • Attribution and Provenance

For registration information and complete details please visit RightsTechSummit.com.

Email us at info@digitalmediawire.com

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RightsTech Summit

July 26, 2016

Japan Society

333 East 47th Street

New York, NY 10017

Bridging The Streaming Music ‘Value Gap’

The global music business offered up two cheers this week for the first signs of life in the recorded music business in nearly a decade. According to International Federation of the Phonographic Industry’s (IFPI) latest global sales report, total recorded music revenue grew 3.2 percent in 2015, to $15.0 billion, the biggest jump since 1998 and the only growth since 2012, when sales ticked up 0.3 percent.

The overall growth IFPI_YouTubecomparisoncame entirely from digital sources, particularly streaming revenue, which jumped 45 percent over 2014, to $2.9 billion, or 19 percent of total revenues. Physical sales continued their decade-long slide, falling another 4.5 percent, buoyed somewhat by the continued renaissance of vinyl.

The strong streaming numbers were not evenly distributed, however. Subscription streaming revenue accounted for $2 billion of the $2.9 billion total, as the total number of paying subscribers reached 68 million, while industry revenue from ad-supported streaming amounted to a mere $634 million, despite more than 900 million listeners worldwide.

The report referred to the mismatch between consumption and revenue to artists and labels as a “market-distorting value gap,” that must be closed, echoing comments last month by RIAA CEO Cary Sherman. Read More »

The Accidental Blockchain Evangelist

PledgeMusic founder and CEO Benji Rogers did not set out to become the leader of a movement when he posted his now-famous essay last November describing how the blockchain — the technological underpinning of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin — could be used to untangle the notoriously Byzantine world of music licensing and payments. Here is new developments in crypto. It was more a thought experiment than a business plan. But his ideas struck such a chord in the industry that Rogers has been thrust into the unwonted role of leading spokesman for the use of blockchain in the music business.

PledgeMusic CEO Benji Rogers

PledgeMusic CEO Benji Rogers

“I could never have imagined that the article I wrote would have the impact that it has,” Rogers would write a few months later in a follow up post. “In the short time since it came out, I have been overwhelmed by offers to speak publicly, offers of help and even offers to fund ‘what you are building.’ So I need to be clear here before we begin: this is not something that I am building.”

There are many in and around the music industry who would like to try, however.

By putting the blockchain at the center of his proposal Rogers helped spark growing interest in the industry in using the technology to bring transparency to the famously opaque world of music rights, where simply identifying who owns a musical work or recording, and who is entitled to be paid for which uses, can be near-impossible, keeping works out of the hands of would-be licensees. Blockchain was a major topic of discussion at this year’s SXSW conference, where it bore for full slate of panels. Read More »

Fighting Fraud And Piracy With Blockchain

Anyone who has ever posted a photograph or original piece of artwork on the internet knows that credit is fleeting. No sooner is it pinned, retweeted or shared then any metadata or watermark linking it to its source is stripped away or simply left behind as it spirals across social media platforms. By the time it reaches the end of the viral chain, even if someone wanted to offer proper attribution that information is all-but impossible to find.

A growing number of entrepreneurs are starting to tackle the issue of digital attribution and authentication, however, by leveraging the Bitcoin screenshot-www.verisart.com 2016-03-24 18-34-07blockchain. This month, New York-based Blockai and Los Angeles-based Verisart went live with new services that allow creators to register their works on the blockchain to create a permanent, indelible record certifying their patrimony and ownership.

The startups join a growing list of blockchain-based authentication services targeting the graphic arts, including Monegraph, ConSensys, ascribe, Stem, Mediachain and others. Just as the blockchain provides an open, self-verifying and decentralized ledger of Bitcoin transactions, it can also be used as a self-verifying database of other types of time-stamped events, such as the registration of a copyright. Those records, moreover, can contain a variety of kinds of data, including a hash of the work itself, the metadata to be associated with it, and information about permitted uses. Thus, any new instance of the work without that metadata would not match the original record and would be shown to be a copy. The permanent records also make it possible to recover the metadata even after it has been stripped away through subsequent uses of the work. Read More »